Monday, September 26, 2016

You have the water. Use it.

I made this post recently on Instagram/Facebook and had a (sort of unusual) request to add to it to the blog. Easily accommodated, so here it is:
Proctor Park
Instagram: The Heights Life

Six-ish years ago, these beautiful trees were just sad, little saplings. They didn't even provide an inch shade. Not long after they were planted, the state of Texas suffered back to back years of horrible drought. Much shade was lost across Houston. Not these trees, though. These trees were loved and cared for by members of this community. It was not unusual to be at the park and see a person pull up in an SUV with a dozen random vessels full of water, lugging them back and forth from curb to root. There were those who found it silly or a waste but look now. Look at them! 
It was a real community effort that saved these trees, but it wasn't organized via social media or discussed at a neighborhood Association meeting. It was just in the heart of people who live in the Heights. No one needed to ask, because enough humans knew what a few gallons of water here and there could do. They now give off enough shade for a family's blanket or a small pack of four legged friends.
I want to ask you now to take an opportunity to water your community. Everyday work to help it grow. Reject the notion that it's too hard to fill buckets of water or that your couple of gallons won't make a difference. Reject the notion it's too hard to love your neighbor *and* their chickens, too hard to go the speed limit to keep children safe, too hard to pick up your dogs waste, too hard to ask your neighbor if they might actually need help mowing that unruly grass, too hard to look at faces which don't look like yours and realize they still want the same simple things like watching a tree grow enough to enjoy it's shade. You have the water. Use it.

1 comment:

  1. Wonderful and inspiring story about Proctor Place - thanks for the good news about our marvelous tree canopy and especially the neighbors that collectively are stewards of their neighborhood - a happy example for us all

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